On January 5, 2022, we discussed the Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters for 2023 proposed rule released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). On April 28, 2022, CMS issued the NBPP 2023 Final Rule. CMS published a Fact Sheet and other resources on April 28, 2022. The rule will take effect on January 1, 2023, but the optional early bird application deadline is May 18, 2022 and the final deadline for issuers to submit changes to their QHP Application is August 17, 2022.
Continue Reading 2023 Payment Rule’s Nondiscrimination Provisions and Anticipation of New Section 1557 Rules

More than 13 million people were enrolled in Medi-Cal in California in September 2021, making it the largest Medicaid program in the nation. In December 2021, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved the California Department of Health Care Services’ (DHCS’) request for a five-year extension of its Medicaid section 1115 demonstration and a five-year extension of its Medicaid managed care section 1915(b) waiver. These Medicaid waivers are part of the “California Advancing and Innovating Medi-Cal” (CalAIM) initiative which was launched in January 2022 to provide aid to California’s most vulnerable residents and to provide more equitable programs and access statewide.
Continue Reading Medicaid and Health Equity: CalAIM’s Bold Experiment

On April 1, 2022, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) announced states may seek to extend Medicaid postpartum coverage from 60 days to one year through a new state plan option offered by the American Rescue Plan Act (“ARPA”). The new state plan option allows state Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (“CHIP”) agencies to provide 12 months of continuous postpartum coverage, regardless of any changes in circumstances, through a state plan amendment (“SPA”). This option is available for five years and ends on March 31, 2027.
Continue Reading CMS Begins Option to Extend Medicaid Postpartum Coverage

Have you been working out recently? We hope so, for today, Day Three of the 40th Annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, was definitely a day for heavy lifting.  Got a challenge that seems overwhelming? A problem that’s big enough to totally scare other folks? Do you eat triathlons for lunch? Well, then you’re going to like the Day Three companies. Let’s talk about fixing the huge American diabetes problem, providing better healthcare for Medicaid and dual eligible beneficiaries, and helping people beat cancer.  All that, plus a COVID-19 thought exercise…

Continue Reading Day Three Notes for the 40th Annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, 2022

Late last month, the Biden Administration announced the second installment of its recovery plan, dubbed the “American Jobs Plan” (the “Plan”).  The Plan’s $2.3 trillion price tag includes
Continue Reading The American Jobs Plan and the American Rescue Plan: The Biden Administration Bets Big on Home and Community-Based Services

January 30th, 2020 marked a dramatic change in Medicaid funding, as the Trump Administration and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) showcased a plan, called the “Healthy Adult Opportunity,” that would permit states to cap Medicaid spending. This was a blow to the Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), which expanded federal spending for low income individuals that did not previously qualify for the program.
Continue Reading ACA Medicaid Expansion Weakens: Trump Administration Unveils Optional Plan for Block Grants

On September 5, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) released a final rule with comment period entitled, “Program Integrity Enhancements to the Provider Enrollment Process” (the “Final Rule”). The Final Rule, aiming to “address various program integrity issues and vulnerabilities by enabling CMS to take action against unqualified and potentially fraudulent entities and individuals,” significantly expands CMS’ ability to deny or revoke the Medicare enrollment of providers (e.g., hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home health agencies, hospices, etc.) and suppliers (e.g., physicians, therapists, ambulance services, durable medical equipment suppliers, etc.) in ways that may create concerns even for providers and suppliers who are fully qualified and have not engaged in any fraudulent conduct.
Continue Reading CMS Finalizes Rule Expanding its Authority to Deny and Revoke Medicare Program Enrollment, Among Other Changes

In a rare act of bipartisanship, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Ranking Member Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced on July 23rd a chairman’s mark, the Prescription Drug Pricing Reduction Act (PDPRA) of 2019 (the “PDPRA” or “Mark”), to lower the price of prescription drugs for Americans. According to the Committee, the Congressional Budget Office (“CBO”) projects that the PDPRA would save taxpayers more than $100 billion in Medicare and Medicaid spending over 10 years, lower Medicare beneficiaries’ out-of-pocket costs by $27 billion and lower beneficiaries’ premiums by $5 billion. The bill passed out of committee by a 19-9 vote on July 25th.

Reaction to the Mark has been mixed. For example, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America criticized the PDPRA as the “wrong approach to lowering drug prices” and predicts it will “siphon” billions of dollars away from research and development without benefitting seniors at the pharmacy counter. America’s Health Insurance Plans was “encouraged” by the Committee’s work and expressed its readiness to work with Congress and the Administration.
Continue Reading Is Prescription Drug Pricing The Cure For Partisanship?

Today, President Trump signed into law a sweeping tax reform bill passed by the House and the Senate on Wednesday that will materially affect virtually every sector in the economy, including, perhaps to a greater degree than others, the healthcare sector. Between the bill’s repeal of the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate penalty tax and other pertinent provisions, we might reasonably expect to see:
Continue Reading President Trump Signs Tax Reform Bill Into Law

While September 30, 2017 has been an important procedural deadline for purposes of the GOP’s most recent legislative push to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), it also serves a critical funding deadline for purposes of the Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) payment program. Absent legislative action, DSH payments are set to be reduced by $2 billion starting October 1, 2017.
Continue Reading Disproportionate Share Hospitals Facing Steep Payment Cuts