The Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) requires hospitals with emergency departments and participating in Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) programs to provide medical screening, treatment and transfer for patients with emergency medical conditions (EMCs) or women in labor.[1] EMTALA, which was enacted in 1986 to address concerns about patient dumping, went unnoticed for many years, but has garnered heightened attention as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and more recently, the Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization (Dobbs).[2]

Continue Reading EMTALA in the Post-Dobbs World

On a daily basis, if not more frequently, we are astounded by our clients’ efforts to prepare for and respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.  As the federal government works to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, guidance from HHS and CMS with respect to waiver of Social Security Act requirements has been rapidly evolving, seemingly overlapping, and emitting from various agencies, leaving many confused about the scope and applicability of the waivers, whether one “supersedes” another, as well as whether any affirmative steps need to be taken in order to “procure” or properly operate under the terms of a waiver.  To help resolve any confusion, outlined below is a summary of the authority for these waivers, how they work together, how and when they apply, and where gaps remain.  We are available to answer your questions as you continue to develop your organization’s COVID-19 preparedness and response plan.

 Coronavirus, COVID-19 pandemic
Continue Reading Bringing Clarity to Section 1135 and Other Waivers amid the COVID-19 Emergency