The AHLA’s Annual Meeting held June 27-29 in Chicago reunited healthcare attorneys across the country. The diverse group of attendees were eager not only to reconnect in-person, but also to process the changes that the now-easing pandemic has brought to all corners of the healthcare industry. The conference presenters grappled in real-time with the transitory nature of the healthcare landscape today, including the significant role that technology has played in driving shifts in care delivery. The panel discussions assessed which changes to healthcare delivery and reimbursement would continue after the pandemic, and in what format.

Continue Reading Recap of AHLA’s Annual Meeting

On January 25, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Treasury (collectively the Tri-Agencies) published the first annual report on group health plans’ and health insurance issuers’ compliance with the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) as amended by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (CAA). The Report noted that none of the comparative analyses reviewed “contained sufficient information upon initial receipt.” The Tri-Agencies made preliminary determinations of non-compliance for many plans and issuers, but the Report stressed that no final determinations had been made yet. Instead, plans and issuers may still take corrective action and, in so doing, avoid the triple-whammy of being named in next year’s report, having notice of noncompliance sent to plan participants and enrollees (essentially rolling out a red carpet for class action litigation), and the Tri-Agencies notifying the state regulator. Plans and issuers should not count on the Tri-Agencies exercising such restraint in the future.
Continue Reading Tri-Agencies Report MHPAEA Compliance Lacking, But Don’t Name and Shame Plans and Issuers . . . Yet

According to a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) study reported in Health Affairs on March 24, 2020, national health care spending reached $3.81 trillion in 2019 and is projected to increase to $4.01 trillion by the end of 2020.  CMS also projects that by 2028, health care spending will reach $6.19 trillion, and will account for 19.7% of GDP, up from 17.7% in 2018.
Continue Reading Venture Capital And Private Equity Investors Take Note: Primary Care May Be The Next Behavioral Health