On May 17, 2024, Colorado Governor signed into law, Senate Bill 24-205, the Colorado Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act (the “Act”). The law will take effect on February 1, 2026 and the Colorado Attorney General will have exclusive enforcement authority. As previewed in our prior blog post, the Act focuses on consumer protection issues when companies develop AI tools and imposes obligations on developers (i.e., creators) and deployers (i.e., users) of “high risk” AI systems. “High-Risk” AI systems (“HRAIS”) are defined as any AI system that “makes, or is a substantial factor in making, a consequential decision.” A substantial factor means one that (1) “assists in making a consequential decision”; (2) “is capable of altering the outcome of a consequential decision”; and (3) “is generated by an artificial intelligence system.” A consequential decision is a decision that has a material legal or similarly significant effect on matters related to education, employment, financial lending services, an essential government service, healthcare services, housing, insurance, or legal services. This article specifically reviews the impact the Act has on healthcare services.Continue Reading Colorado’s Artificial Intelligence Act Impact on Healthcare Decisions

At last week’s America’s Physician Group Spring conference in San Diego, California, our team heard firsthand how physicians are leading efforts to integrate Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications in ambulatory and inpatient settings in major healthcare systems across the nation. Physician and IT leaders described in detail their organizations’ efforts to identify safe, cost-effective, desirable ways to leverage AI to enhance the efficiency and quality of patient care and reduce physicians’ administrative workload. Here, we highlight key approaches that have generated early success for various health systems and physician groups, as well as key pitfalls that participants looking to adopt these technologies need to account for in their planning.Continue Reading How Physicians are Pioneering Use of AI Applications in Ambulatory and Inpatient Care

If your organization has not updated its policies to comply with Utah’s Artificial Intelligence Policy Act (the “Act”), now is the time. As we noted in a prior blog post, this law took effect on May 1st. While it imposes certain AI-related disclosure obligations on businesses and individuals as a whole, the obligations for regulated occupations (which include those licensed by the Utah Division of Professional Licensing, such as clinical services provided by a licensed healthcare provider, including a physician or nurse), are stricter.Continue Reading Utah Providers – Are You Complying with the AI Policy Act?

This week in New York, many leading health systems came together for the long-running Not-For-Profit Health Care Investors Conference, now sponsored by Barclays, HFMA and the American Hospital Association. The conference allowed investors and industry observers to take the pulse of the nation’s non-profit health systems and to note some interesting trends.Continue Reading Notes from the Barclays 24th Annual Not-for-Profit Health Care Investors Conference