Healthcare Information

San Francisco (Wednesday, January 10, 2018) – The third afternoon of the conference was a deep dive into data and analytics, with successive presentations by IBM Watson Health, Inovalon and AthenaHealth and an earlier morning presentation by Chinese genomics company BGI. Significant progress was reported and, interestingly, the more these companies (and others like them) can do, the more that the market expands with new requests and newly discovered needs (a la “what can you really use a tablet for anyway?”). Inovalon reported that the total addressable market has grown in their estimation from $84 billion (as calculated back in 2014) to $142 billion as of 2018. Breaking that down, they believe that there currently is about $40 billion of demand from the provider sector, $51 billion from pharma/life sciences, $17 billion from payors and $33 billion from consumers.
Continue Reading Day 3 Notes on the 2018 JP Morgan Healthcare Conference

San Francisco (Tuesday, January 9, 2018): Day 2 of the 2018 JP Morgan Healthcare Conference provided concrete examples of the trends that have been discussed in recent years – the impact of shifting healthcare delivery modalities on hospitals, the opportunity for retail medicine, the need for more effective management of chronic conditions and the increasing relevance of the Chinese markets. While some attendees complained about a lack of blockbuster announcements, today’s presentations were intriguing as an example of how the consulting and conference recommendations of the 2010 – 2014 period now are being played out in the real world of healthcare today. As the CEO of Advocate Health Care said, with tongue in cheek and quoting Game of Thrones, “Winter is coming….” and healthcare delivery will become even more difficult. There also was cause for optimism as well, as we saw multiple vibrant strategies for growth, including a continuing shift to value-based and risk-based reimbursement structures.
Continue Reading Notes on Day 2 of the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference

San Francisco (Monday, January 8, 2018): Outside it was raining heavily today in San Francisco, but inside the 2018 JP Morgan Healthcare Conference the weather was distinctly sunny. Nary a hint of gloom or pessimism was heard today from the hospitals and health plans presenting at the conference, even after the joys of last year’s “repeal and replace,” tax “relief” and the multiple redirections from CMS. Instead, we saw optimism, continuing implementation of prior strategic plans and, generally, continuing consensus of the need for greater scale; more analytics, digital engagement, big data and artificial intelligence; more population health management; and value-based/risk-based arrangements. Here’s some highlights from today’s proceedings:
Continue Reading Day 1 Notes from the 2018 JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco

Dr. Mario Molina, CEO of Molina Healthcare, discusses the implications of potential cuts to cost sharing reduction payments under the Affordable Care Act by the Trump Administration.  Cost sharing reduction payments are viewed by many as essential in the provision of healthcare to low income individuals as they help to reduce co-pays and deductibles that may otherwise be out of reach for many.  Dr. Molina distills the issue into lay terms and provides some insight into the future of the government’s involvement in the healthcare markets under the new administration.
Continue Reading CEO of Molina Healthcare Discusses Implications of Cuts to Affordable Care Act

In a November 14, 2016 Forbes article entitled, “Under Trump, Americans Can Finally Put ObamaCare Behind Us,” Sally Pipes wrote, “ObamaCare in a full-on ‘death spiral,’ voters were clearly in no mood for Clinton’s plan to ‘build on’ the president’s healthcare law. Instead, they chose a president who has said that his first order of business following President Trump’s inauguration on January 20, will be to ‘ask Congress to immediately deliver a full repeal of ObamaCare.’”  Notwithstanding Ms. Pipes confidence in a full repeal, in a Wall Street Journal article dated November 11, 2016, “Donald Trump, in Exclusive Interview, Tells WSJ He Is Willing to Keep Parts of Obama Health Law” by Monica Langley and Gerard Baker, Mr. President-elect Donald Trump said that he favors keeping the ObamaCare provisions which prohibit insurers from denying coverage because of existing conditions and which allows parents to provide additional years of  coverage for children on their insurance policies.  “I like those very much,” Mr. Trump is reported as saying.
Continue Reading Very Opaque to Slightly Transparent: Shedding Light on the Future of Healthcare

The ancient Chinese curse – “May you live in interesting times” – certainly springs to mind these days.  What does the election of Donald Trump mean for the healthcare industry, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and current healthcare market trends?  Let’s take a quick look at the likely effects of the election, but first let’s set the stage:

Background Data:

  • Per a July 2016 federal Department of Health and Human Services study, it is estimated that 18% of 2016 personal income in aggregate will be spent on healthcare, with 5% of the population accounting for nearly half of the estimated $3.3 trillion 2016 healthcare spending and 50% of the population spending less than $3,000 each.
  • The healthcare cost reduction effect of the Great Recession has dissipated, with an anticipated healthcare cost increase of over 5% per year projected through 2025. The economic drag on the U.S. economy of healthcare spending has returned to almost pre-recession levels, and accountable care organization (ACO) savings to date have been relatively nominal.
  • Once aged in, Medicare will have over 70 million Baby Boomer generation seniors to care for…and with rising life expectancy comes greater lifetime healthcare costs.
  • The United States will have a shortfall of doctors before 2025, with a significant primary care shortfall expected, a significant shortage of doctors available who accept Medicaid and the U.S. ranked as the 24th of 28 countries by the number of doctors per thousand people among the Organization for Economic Development countries.
  • 20 million people were afforded insurance under ACA programs, including over 9 – 11 million (varies depending on source studies) in 2016 through the insurance exchanges and the remainder through Medicaid expansion in 32 states (as of September 2016).
  • Approximately 73 million Americans were covered by Medicaid or CHIP. Federal subsidies for Medicaid expansion are to trend downwards to 90% by 2020.  A growing number of states are moving toward managed Medicaid programs in an effort to contain costs that, in some instances, previously threatened to bankrupt state budgets in the absence of further tax increases.


Continue Reading “May You Live in Interesting Times” – Some Healthcare Predictions for the Trump Administration’s First Year