Artificial Intelligence

On May 17, 2024, Colorado Governor signed into law, Senate Bill 24-205, the Colorado Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act (the “Act”). The law will take effect on February 1, 2026 and the Colorado Attorney General will have exclusive enforcement authority. As previewed in our prior blog post, the Act focuses on consumer protection issues when companies develop AI tools and imposes obligations on developers (i.e., creators) and deployers (i.e., users) of “high risk” AI systems. “High-Risk” AI systems (“HRAIS”) are defined as any AI system that “makes, or is a substantial factor in making, a consequential decision.” A substantial factor means one that (1) “assists in making a consequential decision”; (2) “is capable of altering the outcome of a consequential decision”; and (3) “is generated by an artificial intelligence system.” A consequential decision is a decision that has a material legal or similarly significant effect on matters related to education, employment, financial lending services, an essential government service, healthcare services, housing, insurance, or legal services. This article specifically reviews the impact the Act has on healthcare services.Continue Reading Colorado’s Artificial Intelligence Act Impact on Healthcare Decisions

At last week’s America’s Physician Group Spring conference in San Diego, California, our team heard firsthand how physicians are leading efforts to integrate Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications in ambulatory and inpatient settings in major healthcare systems across the nation. Physician and IT leaders described in detail their organizations’ efforts to identify safe, cost-effective, desirable ways to leverage AI to enhance the efficiency and quality of patient care and reduce physicians’ administrative workload. Here, we highlight key approaches that have generated early success for various health systems and physician groups, as well as key pitfalls that participants looking to adopt these technologies need to account for in their planning.Continue Reading How Physicians are Pioneering Use of AI Applications in Ambulatory and Inpatient Care

If your organization has not updated its policies to comply with Utah’s Artificial Intelligence Policy Act (the “Act”), now is the time. As we noted in a prior blog post, this law took effect on May 1st. While it imposes certain AI-related disclosure obligations on businesses and individuals as a whole, the obligations for regulated occupations (which include those licensed by the Utah Division of Professional Licensing, such as clinical services provided by a licensed healthcare provider, including a physician or nurse), are stricter.Continue Reading Utah Providers – Are You Complying with the AI Policy Act?

This week in New York, many leading health systems came together for the long-running Not-For-Profit Health Care Investors Conference, now sponsored by Barclays, HFMA and the American Hospital Association. The conference allowed investors and industry observers to take the pulse of the nation’s non-profit health systems and to note some interesting trends.Continue Reading Notes from the Barclays 24th Annual Not-for-Profit Health Care Investors Conference 

California is among a handful of states that seeks to regulate the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) in connection with utilization review in the managed care space. SB 1120, sponsored by the California Medical Association, would require algorithms, AI and other software tools used for utilization review to comply with specified requirements. We continue to keep up to date on AI related law, policy and guidance. The Sheppard Mullin Healthcare Team has written on AI related topics this year and those articles are listed here: i) AI Related Developments, ii) FTC’s 2024 PrivacyCon Part 1, and iii) FTC’s 2024 PrivacyCon Part 2. Also, our Artificial Intelligence Team’s blog can be found here. Experts report that anywhere from 50 to 75% of tasks associated with utilization review can be automated. AI might be excellent at handling routine authorizations and modernizing workflows, but there is a risk of over-automation. For example, population trends of medical necessity can miss unusual clinical presentations. SB 1120 seeks to address these concerns. Continue Reading The Intersection of Artificial Intelligence and Utilization Review

This is the second post in a two-part series on PrivacyCon’s key-takeaways for healthcare organizations. The first post focused on healthcare privacy issues.[1] This post focuses on insights and considerations relating to the use of Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) in healthcare. In the AI segment of the event, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) covered: (1) privacy themes; (2) considerations for Large Language Models (“LLMs”); and (3) AI functionality.Continue Reading Artificial Intelligence Highlights from FTC’s 2024 PrivacyCon

At the first day of the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, “[T]he answer to the ultimate question of life, the universe and everything is 42.” Recognize that famous line? No, it’s not something from ChatGPT, it’s Douglas Adams’ “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy of Healthcare.” Well, not healthcare…for that you have to be here in San Francisco for the 42nd edition of this conference. It was indeed an intriguing day, for even without major announcements, there were very clear signs and portents of our coming year in the healthcare industry.Continue Reading Day 1 Notes from the 42nd Annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference

Recent developments in Artificial Intelligence (AI) have been transforming several sectors, and the healthcare industry is no exception. In the second episode of Sheppard Mullin’s Health-e Law Podcast, Jim Gatto, a partner at Sheppard Mullin and the co-leader of its AI Team, explores the significant implications and challenges of incorporating AI into the healthcare industry with Sheppard Mullin’s Digital Health Team co-chairs, Sara Shanti and Phil Kim.Continue Reading AI as an Aid – Emerging Uses in Healthcare: A Discussion with Jim Gatto

Last week’s historic executive order (EO) on the development and use of artificial intelligence (AI) is teeming with urgency, both in caution and optimism, to keep pace with the technological advancements. The EO addresses the duality of AI—its promising utility and disconcerting risks—across a range of public and private sectors, including healthcare. Below are five key takeaways from the EO for the healthcare industry.Continue Reading AI’s Executive Order and Its Key Healthcare Implications